Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2015, Page: 197-206
Application of AMMI and Tai’s Stability Statistics for Yield Stability Analysis in Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) Cultivars Grown in Central Highlands of Ethiopia
Tamene T. Tolessa, Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center, Kulumsa, Asella, Ethiopia; International Livestock Research Institute, Addis Ababa, EthiopiaKulumsa Agricultural Research Center, Kulumsa, Asella, Ethiopia; International Livestock Research Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Received: Jun. 25, 2015;       Accepted: Jul. 7, 2015;       Published: Jul. 17, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.jps.20150304.15      View  5437      Downloads  289
Abstract
Seventeen faba bean cultivars released over three decades including four promising genotypes in the pipeline were evaluated at five locations in 2007 and two locations in 2009 main cropping seasons in central highlands of Ethiopia. The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude and pattern of G × E interaction and yield stability. The study was conducted using a randomized complete block design with four replications. G × E interaction and yield stability were estimated using AMMI and Tai’s stability methods. Pooled analysis of variance for grain yield showed significant differences at (p ≤ 0.001) among the main effects of genotypes and environments and at (p ≤ 0.01) for G × E interaction effects. This indicated that either the genotypes differentially responded to the changes in the test environments or the test environments differentially discriminated the genotypes or both. Environment main effect accounted for 73.6% of the total yield variation; whereas, genotype and G × E interaction effects accounted for 5.0% and 8.5%, respectively, indicating the necessity for the need of spatial and temporal replication of variety trial. The first two multiplicative component terms sum of squares of the AMMI explained 66.6% of the interaction effect. No single cultivar showed superior performance across all environments but cultivars TUMSA and DOSHA, followed by CS20DK were top ranked at 71.4% and 57.1% of the environments, respectively and found the most stable across environments. Based on Tai’s stability analysis, eight of the tested cultivars exhibited average stability; whereas, none of them was able to demonstrate a static performance stability. Generally, the application of AMMI and Tai’s methods were facilitated the visual comparison and identification of superior cultivars, thereby supporting decisions on faba bean cultivar recommendation for different environments.
Keywords
Cultivars, Faba Bean, G x E Interaction, Grain Yield, Stability
To cite this article
Tamene T. Tolessa, Application of AMMI and Tai’s Stability Statistics for Yield Stability Analysis in Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) Cultivars Grown in Central Highlands of Ethiopia, Journal of Plant Sciences. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, pp. 197-206. doi: 10.11648/j.jps.20150304.15
Reference
[1]
Degago Y. Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) in Ethiopia. Institute of Biodiversity Conservation and Research (IBCR), 2000; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[2]
Jarso M, Keneni G. Vicia faba L. In: Cereals and Pulses (Plant Resources of Tropical Africa 1), Brink, M. and G. Belay (Eds.). Backhuys Publishers, Netherlands, 2006; ISBN-13: 9789057821707, pp: 195-199.
[3]
CSA. Agricultural sample survey on area and production of major crops. Statistical Bulletin No. 532, Central Statistical Agency, 2013; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
[4]
Hacıseferogullari H, Gezer I, Bahtiyarca Y, Menges HO. Determination of some chemical and physical properties of Sakiz faba bean (Vicia faba L. Var. major). J. Food Eng. 2003; 60: 475-479.
[5]
Keneni G, Jarso M, Wolabu T. Faba Bean (Vicia faba L.) Genetics and Breeding Research in Ethiopia: A Review. In: Food and Forage Legumes of Ethiopia: Progress and Prospects, Ali K, Keneni G, Ahmed S, Malhotra R, Beniwal S, Makkouk K, Halila MH (Eds.). ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria. 2006.
[6]
Gorfu A, Feyissa D. Role of Food Legumes in Cropping System in Ethiopia. A Review. In: Food and Forage Legumes of Ethiopia: Progress and Prospects, Ali K, Keneni G, Ahmed S, Malhotra R, Beniwal S, Makkouk K, Halila MH (Eds.). ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria. 2006.
[7]
Tilaye A, Tesfaye G, Beyene D. Genetics and Breeding of Faba Bean. In: Cool-Season Food Legumes of Ethiopia, Tilaye A, Bejiga G, Saxena MC, Solh MB (Eds.). ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria. 1994.
[8]
Fisseha R. Weed Research in Cool-Season Food Legumes. In: Cool-Season Food Legumes of Ethiopia, Tilaye A, Bejiga G, Saxena MC, Solh MB (Eds.). ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria. 1994.
[9]
Gorfu D, Beshir T. Faba Bean Disease in Ethiopia. In: Cool-Season Food Legumes of Ethiopia, Tilaye A, Bejiga G, Saxena MC, Solh MB (Eds.). ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria. 1994.
[10]
Ali K. Insect-pest Management Research of Faba Bean and Field Pea in Ethiopia. In: Food and Forage Legumes of Ethiopia: Progress and Prospects, Ali K, Keneni G, Ahmed S, Malhotra R, Beniwal S, Makkouk K, Halila MH (Eds.). ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria. 2006.
[11]
Bekele B, Muhammad G, Galano T, Belayneh T. Faba Bean and Field Pea Research in Ethiopia. In: Food and Forage Legumes of Ethiopia: Progress and Prospects, Ali K, Keneni G, Ahmed S, Malhotra R, Beniwal S, Makkouk K, Halila MH (Eds.). ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria. 2006.
[12]
MoA. Plant variety release, protection and seed quality control: Crop variety register. Ministry of Agriculture, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 2013.
[13]
Navabi A, Yang RC, Helm J, Spaner DM. Can spring wheat-growing mega-environments in the northern great-plains be dissected for representative locations or niche-adapted genotypes? Crop Sci. 2006; 46: 1107-1116.
[14]
Yan W. GGE biplot vs. AMMI graphs for genotype-by-environment data analysis. J. Indian Soc. Agric. Stat. 2011; 65: 181-193.
[15]
Sabah MA, El-Hady MM, El-Taweel AM, El-Harty EH. Stability statistics of some faba bean genotypes. Ann. Agric. Sci. Moshtohor. 2007; 45: 525-544.
[16]
Mohammadi R, Armion M, Shabani A, Daryaei A. Identification of stability and adaptability in advanced durum genotypes using AMMI analysis. Asian J. Plant Sci. 2007; 6: 1261-1268.
[17]
Zobel RW, Wright MJ, Gauch HG. Statistical analysis of a yield trial. Agron. J. 1988; 80: 388-393.
[18]
Crossa J. Statistical analyses of multilocation trials. Adv. Agron. 1990; 44: 55-85.
[19]
Hussein MA,Bjornstad A, Aastveit AH. SASG x ESTAB: A SAS program for computing genotype x environment stability statistics. Agron. J. 2000; 92: 454-459.
[20]
Ferreira DF, Demetrio CGB, Manly BFJ, Machado ADA, Vencovsky R. Statistical model in agriculture: Biometrical methods for evaluating phenotypic stability in plant breeding. Cerne Lavras. 2006; 12: 373-388.
[21]
Tai GCC. Genotypic stability analysis and its application to potato regional trials. Crop Sci. 1971; 11: 184-190.
[22]
Thillainathan M, Fernandez GC. SAS applications for Tai’s stability analysis and AMMI model in Genotype x Environmental Interaction (GEI) effects. J. Hered. 2001; 92: 367-371.
[23]
Samonte SOP, Wilson LT, McClung AM, Medley JC. Targeting cultivars onto rice growing environments using AMMI and SREG GGE biplot analyses. Crop Sci. 2005; 45: 2414-2424.
[24]
Jarso M, Degago Y. Genotypes X environment interaction and grain yield stability in faba bean. Proceedings of the 8th Annual Conference of the Crop Sci. Society of Ethiopia, February 26-27, 1997, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 1999, 16-25.
[25]
Jarso M, Keneni G, Asaminew B, Tadese W, Mulgeta W, Tadese T. Performance of elite faba bean genotypes for grain yield under waterlogged vertisols of the Ethiopian highlands. Proceedings of the 10th Annual Conference of the Crop Sci. Society of Ethiopia, June 2001, EARO, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2001, 19-21.
[26]
Fikere M, Tadesse T, Letta T. Genotype-environment interactions and stability parameters for grain yield of faba bean (Vicia faba L.) genotypes grown in Southeastern Ethiopia. Int. J. Sustainable Crop Prod. 2008b; 3: 80-87.
[27]
Fikere M, Tadesse T, Suso MJ, Legesse T. Analysis of Multi-environment yield performance of Faba bean (Vacia faba L.) genotypes Using AMMI model. J. Genet. Breed. 2008a; 62: 25-30.
[28]
SAS (Statistical Analysis Software). SAS/STAT Guide for Personal Computers. Version 9.0, SAS Institute Inc., Carry, NC., USA. 2002.
[29]
Hernandez MV, Crossa J. The AMMI analysis and graphing the biplot. Biometrics and Statistics Unit, CIMMYT, Mexico, March 2000. http://repository.cimmyt.org:8080/xmlui/ bitstream/handle/10883/585/73247.pdf.
[30]
Burgueno J, Crossa J, Vargas M. SAS Programs for graphing GE and GGE biplots. CIMMYT, INT. Mexico. http://www.cimmyt.org/biometrics/biplots.exe. Accessed 20 September, 2012.
[31]
Fox PN, Skovmand B, Thompson BK, Braun HJ, Cormier R. Yield and adaptation of hexaploid spring triticale. Euphytica, 1990; 47: 57-64.
[32]
Pham HN, Kang MS. Interrelationships among and repeatability of several stability statistics estimated from international maize trials. Crop Sci. 1988; 28: 925-928.
[33]
Gollob HF. A statistical model which combines features of factor analytic and analysis of variance techniques. Psychometrika, 1968; 33: 73-115.
[34]
Gauch GH, Zobel RW. AMMI Analysis of Yield Trials. In: Genotype-by Environment Interaction, Kang MS, Gauch HG. (Eds.). Taylor and Francis, Boca Raton, FL., 1996; 85-122.
[35]
Ebdon JS, Gauch HG. Additive main effect and multiplicative interaction analysis of national turf-grass performance trials. Crop Sci. 2002; 42: 489-496.
[36]
Voltas J, van Eeuwijk F, Igartua E, del Moral LFG, Molina-Cano JL, Romagosa I. Genotype by Environment Interaction and Adaptation in Barley Breeding: Basic Concepts and Methods of Analysis. In: Barley Science: Recent Advances from Molecular Biology to Agronomy of Yield and Quality, Slafer, G.A., J.L. Molina-Cano, R. Savin, J.L. Araus and I. Romagosa (Eds.). The Harworth Press Inc., New York, 2002; 205-241.
[37]
Asfaw A, Alemayehu F, Gurum F, Atnaf M. AMMI and SREG GGE biplot analysis for matching varieties onto soybean production environments in Ethiopia. Scient. Res. Essays, 2009; 4: 1322-1330.
Browse journals by subject